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The Screen’s Foremost Artist – Motion Picture News (1927)

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The Screen’s Foremost Artist – Motion Picture News (1927) Lillian Gish The Screen’s Foremost ArtistTo question the dramatic talent of Lillian Gish would be akin to questioning the beauty of Caruso’s voice. Among performers on the screen she is truly set apart — always the artist — a star that reaches greatness with a gesture, tragedy with an enigmatic smile. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer features her because she is great. One would be hard put to it to name a player who has glorified more outstanding successes or one who more rightly deserves the title ot “first lady of the screen.” From “The Birth of a Nation” to “Annie Laurie,” Miss Gish has ever graced the boards as an attraction ot high quality and an entertainment name worthy of double or treble the customary admission charge.

We’re Surprised, Lillian! – MOTOGRAPHY August 19, 1916. - Diane of the Follies

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We’re Surprised, Lillian! – MOTOGRAPHY August 19, 1916.Diane of The Follies – Lillian Gish MOTOGRAPHY August 19, 1916. We’re Surprised, Lillian! Lillian Gish has adopted a course of training as strenuous as a professional pugilist in order to get into the best possible condition for her “rough house” work in the Triangle-Fine Arts production. “Diana of the Follies.” Miss Gish has several free-for-all fights in the picture, including one at her husband’s house and another on the stage of the opera house in which several chorus girls mix in.

“ROMOLA” by Albert Bigelow Paine – 1932

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“ROMOLA” by Albert Bigelow Paine – 1932
“ROMOLA” Albert Bigelow Paine – 1932 Reports from “The White Sister” showed that it was going to make record runs—that returns from it would be very large. Catholics and Protestants alike approved it. Father Duffy, of the Fighting Irish 69th Regiment, of New York, wrote: I wish to nominate “The White Sister” for a high place on the White List of dramatic performances…. It is religion struggling with human passions, as in real life, and gaining its victory after storm and stress. Chicago society deserted the opera on the opening night of “The White Sister,” and similar reports came from elsewhere. Lillian’s personal tribute—her “fan” mail—assumed mountainous proportions: offers of engagements, protection, marriage, requests for loans… what not?
Vanity Fair Nov 1923 – Lillian Gish Romola
Meantime, one must get on with the next picture. King was already in Italy, making a pirate ship scene. Lillian finished cutting down “The White Sister,” for road…