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HEARTS OF THE WORLD 1918 – Entire film

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  HEARTS OF THE WORLD 1918 – Entire film HEARTS OF THE WORLD Opened at the 44th Street Theatre, New York, April 4, 1918. 12 reels. Directed by D. W. Griffith; scenario by M. Gaston de Tolignac, translated into English by Capt. Victor Marier (both pseudonyms for D. W. Griffith); photographed by G. W. Bitzer; technical supervision by Erich Von Stroheim; music arranged by Carli Elinor and Griffith. Cast: The Grandfather – Adolphe Lestina The Mother – Josephine Crowell The Girl, Marie Stephenson – Lillian Gish The Boy, Douglas Gordon Hamilton – Robert Harron The Father of the Boy – Jack Cosgrave The Mother of the Boy – Kate Bruce The Littlest Brother – Ben Alexander The Boy’s Other Brothers – M. Emmons, F. Marion The Little Disturber – Dorothy Gish Monsieur Cuckoo – Robert Anderson The Village Carpenter – George Fawcett Von Strohm – George Siegmann The Innkeeper – Fay Holderness A Deaf and Blind Musician – L. Lowy A Poilu – Eugene Pouyet A French Peasant Girl – Anna Mae Walthall A Refugee

True Heart Susie (1919) Entire film

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True Heart Susie (1919) Entire film Director: D.W. Griffith Writer: Marian Fremont (story) Released under Paramount Pictures’ prestigious Artcraft label. In 1919 Adolph Zukor devised a three-tiered brand system – the Artcraft division for its high-end, A-list product (ones that could command higher roadshow admissions in major cities) and Realart on the opposite end. The middle tier, which comprised the bulk of the studio’s mainstream releases, was the Paramount banner. This quality classification existed for five years. Note: The life-story of handsome Harron — who had earlier co-starred in the modern episode of Griffith’s Intolerance (1916) — is quite tragic and mysterious; he died from a gunshot wound the year after this film was released, under shadowy circumstances. Lillian Gish … True Heart Susie Robert Harron … William Jenkins Wilbur Higby … William’s father Loyola O’Connor … Susie’s aunt George Fawcett … The Stranger Clarine Seymour … Bettina Hopkins Kate Bruce … Bettina’s aunt

Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) Entire Documentary

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  Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) Entire Documentary Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) Very few people know that Hollywood was largely dominated by women as filmmakers in the 1910s and 20s, there were more women producers and directors in powerful positions before 1920 than at any other time in the motion picture history. Their names were Lois Weber, Mary Pickford, Frances Marion, Alice Guy Blaché, Dorothy Arzner etc … Before the Big Crash women were creatively working in Hollywood at all levels. Unbelievable as it may seem, it took until 2010 for a woman – Kathryn Bigelow – to receive an Oscar for Best Director! Casting in the documentary includes the most successful women to date, Paula Wagner, producer and business partner of Tom Cruise, Robin Swicord, screenwriter and Lynda Obst, producer of, amongst others, Sleepless in Seattle, Contact and Flashdance. And Lillian Gish and Sherry Lansing (archives) 1920 American actress Lillian Gish (1893-1993) makes her only foray into directin

KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview (TV Capture)

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  KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview (TV Capture) Lillian Gish – Mary Martin (Over Easy Camera, New York) Critics, historians, and scholars are virtually unaminous in their agreement that Griffith’s greatest performer was Lillian Gish. John Barrymore compared her with Bernhardt and Duse. Critics rhapsodized over her “Dresden porcelain” beauty. She started with Griffith in 1912 at the age of sixteen and became his preeminent interpreter in such major works as The Birth of a Nation, Broken Blossoms, Way Down East, and Orphans of the Storm. KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview – HDV 720p TV Capture Back to Lillian Gish Home page

Central City Opera House – Now and Then – HDV 720p 29.97 fps

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  Central City Opera House – Now and Then – HDV 720p 29.97 fps In 1877, the citizens of Central City organized a fundraising drive for a grand new opera house befitting the gold mining town’s reputation as “the richest square mile on earth.” Many of the town’s residents were Welsh and Cornish miners, who brought with them a rich tradition of music from their homeland. Prominent Denver architect Robert S. Roeschlaub provided an elegant, understated design for the stone structure, and San Francisco artist John C. Massman added elaborate trompe l’oeil murals to the interior. Her early glory years following the 1878 grand opening were short-lived. When the Central City mines were played out, the Opera House fell into disrepair. Fortunately, a volunteer-driven effort led by Ida Kruse McFarlane, Edna Chappell and Anne Evans led to an extensive restoration of the Opera House in 1932. That summer, the legendary actress Lillian Gish opened the newly restored opera house with Camille, launching

Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives

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  Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives – TV capture VHS quality First lady of the screen, Miss Lillian Gish in an interview filmed in 1978, presented by CBC as an episode in their “Retro-Bites” series. Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives – TV capture VHS quality *** Admin note: Featured photo of Lillian Gish was taken in 1978 indeed, but is a still frame from an interview at BBC Television London. The material above has a low VHS resolution (TV capture) thus any still frame will be affected by the poor footage quality. Thank you for your understanding. Back to Lillian Gish Home page

”The Greatest Question” 1919 – Entire film

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  ”The Greatest Question” 1919 – Entire film A wave of interest in spiritualism has been sweeping the world since the days of the great war. Does after life exist? Can dear one across the Great Beyond exert an influence over earthly destinies? What is the answer to the eternal problem of death ? Griffith had all these questions in mind when he started to screen “The Greatest Question.” So the vital theme of “The Great Question” was carefully buried beneath “action” at “punch.” It became the story of a little waif in the hands of a murderously brutal farmers couple, her love for a neighboring boy and the subsequent finding of oil—with its attendant avalanche of wealth. The whole is gilded with the philosophy that a simple faith meet and overcomes all obstacles. Back to Lillian Gish Home page