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My Sister and I – By Lillian Gish (November 1927, ”Theatre Magazine”)

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  My Sister and I – By Lillian Gish (November 1927, ”Theatre Magazine”) My Sister and I Celebrity of the Screen Pays a Remarkable and Touching Tribute to Her Chum Relative – Dorothy By Lillian Gish November 1927, ”Theatre Magazine” *** This story was included in Miss Gish’s autobiography ”The Movies Mr. Griffith and Me” with the mention ”During this period, Dorothy and I wrote character sketches of each other for Stage magazine. I wrote of her:” She is a criticism of all the things I am not. When I look at her, I always miss in myself the qualities that I was born without and that, I daresay, I should have been much happier with. She is laughter, even on the cloudy days of life; nothing bothers her or saddens her or concerns her lastingly. Trouble gives only an evanescent shadow to her eyes and is banished with a shrug of a shoulder. Work to her, however, is play. Had she been born a boy, she would, I feel certain, have smeared her face with brown butternut oil and gone ’round the worl

The Gallant Gish Girls (Life Magazine 1951) By Richard L. Williams (PDF)

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  The Gallant Gish Girls (Life Magazine 1951) By Richard L. Williams (PDF) The Gallant Gish Girls ON TV, STAGE AND SCREEN THEY ARE ADDING LUSTER TO THEIR CAREERS By RICHARD L. WILLIAMS WITH the unlikely exceptions of Mata Hari, the lady spy, or Osa Johnson, the lady explorer, the Misses Lillian and Dorothy Gish have probably lived more dangerously than any women of their time. The Gish sisters are actresses, in the traditional, uncorrupted and perhaps obsolescent sense, and to find the period in which they did their dangerous living you have to go back beyond television, even beyond radio to the practically prehistoric heyday of the silent film. The Gishes—and one generation has to take another’s word for it—were among the first, finest and most fearless stars of that forgotten medium. For 18 years they regularly risked their lives, limbs and nervous systems before cranking cameras whose operators wore their caps backward. All in a day’s work the sisters rode careening coaches, jumped