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D.W Griffith American Film Master by Iris Barry – 1965 (Electronic Format PDF)

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  D.W Griffith American Film Master by Iris Barry – 1965 (Electronic Format PDF) D.W Griffith American Film Master by Iris Barry – 1965 With an annotated list of films by Eileen Bowser The Museum of Modern Art, New York Film enthusiasts and scholars have come to regard this long out of print book as the chief source of information about a key figure in the development of the American film. It is now published in an edition that adds to the colorful observation of the original a wealth of illuminating factual data from Griffith’s personal and business papers. D. W. Griffith: American Film Master first appeared in 1940 in conjunction with a pioneering retrospective exhibition of Griffith’s films at The Museum of Modern Art. As first curator of the Museum’s Film Library, Iris Barry had uncovered and re-examined the films Griffith made at the very beginning of his career, and it was she who first saw that in the four years following 1908 he had actually established all the principles on wh

Movie Star – A Look at the Women Who Made Hollywood – By Ethan Mordden (1983) PDF

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  Movie Star – A Look at the Women Who Made Hollywood – By Ethan Mordden (1983) PDF Little Mary Pickford’s fans didn’t want Shakespeare in the first place, and they must have been thinking, Who needs this? Where’s our righter of wrongs? Where’s our comic? This is what went wrong with Little Mary’s four sound films: the contemporary Mary is not what her following wanted, and the few moments of the old fighting, comic Mary are wrong for the 1930s. And the oddest thing of all is: she knew this. Mary Pickford It’s the characters that mark the major changes, changes that were under way throughout the 1920s, when Little Mary was still the biggest thing in cinema and when Gish, through the presentation of her commitment, could play nun and harlot, then Renaissance dame and industrial-age slavey, and make us accept them all as variants on one all-basic vision of womanly wisdom and beauty and balance. Virtually behind their backs, movies turned around, as the culture did. Gish went back to the

The War, the West, and the Wilderness – By Kevin Brownlow (1979) PDF Download

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  The War, the West, and the Wilderness – By Kevin Brownlow (1979) PDF Download The War, The West and the Wilderness By Kevin Brownlow – 1979 Alfred A. Knopf – New York Manufactured in the United States of America – First Edition Lars Hanson and Lillian Gish – The Wind THE WIND The wretched conditions of sand, wind, and drought that characterized the Sundown location were brilliantly evoked in bleak, Scandinavian style by Victor Seastrom in MGM’s The Wind (1927, released 1928). Although more of a psychological than a realistic study, and more impressionistic than documentary in its treatment, The Wind is filled with remarkably expressive detail. For an utterly unromantic view of life on the desert, this film is unequaled. Lillian Gish plays a delicate Virginia girl who comes to live with her cousin and finds the life intolerable. The wind howls symbolically around the tiny shack, until nerve ends are stretched to the breaking point. Even the children, usually a sentimental high point o

AT THIS THEATRE – Louis Botto (2002) – PDF Download

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  AT THIS THEATRE – Louis Botto (2002) – PDF Download 100 Years of Broadway Shows, Stories and Stars Louis Botto – 2002 edited by Robert Viagas Copyright © 2002 by Playbill Incorporated In November 1960 a beautiful play came to the Belasco. Tad Mosel’s All the Way Home, adapted from James Agee’s novel A Death in the Family, starred Arthur Hill, Lillian Gish, Colleen Dewhurst, and Aline MacMahon. It etched with feeling the impact of a young fathers death on his family. It was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award as the best play of the season. In April 1930 producer Jed Harris, known as the boy wonder, returned from London and produced and directed an acclaimed revival of Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya, adapted by Mrs. Ben Hecht (Rose Caylor). Harris’s direction and the acting of his sterling cast, Lillian Gish, Osgood Perkins, Walter Connolly, Eduardo Ciannelli Joanna Roos, and others, made the occasion a theatrical event. A dramatization of the infamous Lizzie

Selected Film Criticism (1912 – 1920) Anthony Slide – PDF download

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  Selected Film Criticism (1912 – 1920) Anthony Slide – PDF download Selected Film Criticism (1912 – 1920) Anthony Slide The extraordinary part of Griffith is that he has never ceased to be a pioneer. He continues to advance. He dares to present novelties of form and novelties of material. He does not always get away with it, but he keeps right on pioneering. He is a long ways from dead, and already the Shakespeare-Bacon controversy has crawled out of its narrow cell and taken a new form in the hexagonal debate as to who invented the close-up. the tale (Broken Blossoms) runs as written except for the very finish, with Lucy dragging out her cowering little life by the London waterside, beaten into semi-imbecility by her accidental father, picked up, reverenced, honored and enthroned by the lonely opium- eater, and at length slain in a monstrous moment of mock-virtue by the insensate chunk that caused her to come into the world. Then the beast dies before the Chinaman’s gun, the Chinaman

Stars of the Silents – By EDWARD WAGENKNECHT (1987) PDF Download

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  Stars of the Silents – By EDWARD WAGENKNECHT (1987) PDF Download Stars of the Silents By EDWARD WAGENKNECHT The Scarecrow Press, Inc. Metuchen, NJ., & London 1987 Copyright © 1987 by Edward Wagenknecht Manufactured in the United States of America Lillian Gish I first met Lillian Gish at the Blackstone Hotel in December 1920, when she came to Chicago for the local opening of Way Down East at the Woods Theater. I did not meet Dorothy until January 1922, when both she and Lillian came for the opening of Orphans of the Storm and occupied the box just behind mine at the Great Northern Theater. The meeting in Chicago referred to at the end of my discussion occurred, again at the Blackstone and later at the railroad station, when Lillian and her mother stopped off between trains when she was on her way to the Coast to take up her M-G-M contract. It is interesting to reflect that of the roles I mention in my penultimate paragraph as being naturals for her, Ophelia is the only one she eve