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Lillian Gish, Maker of Memories – By Kevin Brownlow (The New York Times 1997)

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Lillian Gish, Maker of Memories – By Kevin Brownlow (The New York Times 1997) The New York Times 1997 Lillian Gish, Maker of Memories By Kevin Brownlow March 2, 1997 BY COMMON CONSENT the greatest actress of the silent era, Lillian Gish personified that remarkable epoch. Her integrity and dedication are among the proudest aspects of the period. There can be few actresses in film history with so many distinguished pictures to their credit: ”The Birth of a Nation,” ”Intolerance,” ”Hearts of the World,” ”Broken Blossoms,” ”Way Down East” and ”Orphans of the Storm,” all directed by the man she called the Father of Film, D. W. Griffith. When she left Griffith and became an independent producer, she contributed further classics — ”The White Sister” and ”Romola” — and while at MGM she made, with Victor Seastrom, ”The Scarlet Letter” and ”The Wind.” Hers was always the one voice to champion the cause of silent film and music, even into recent decades, when to articulate such an idea was to r…

Then and Now – Lillian Gish – By Seymour Peck (The New York Times 1960)

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Then and Now – Lillian Gish – By Seymour Peck (The New York Times 1960) Then and Now – Lillian Gish By Seymour Peck The New York Times – Sunday, April 17, 1960 AT 6, Lillian Gish became an actress, not out of love, but out of necessity. “We were very poor,” she says,” and the job paid $10 a week.” Today at 61, Miss Gish is still an actress, not out of necessity, but out of love. When her close friend Mary Pickford phoned her recently, Miss Gish told her she had been working very hard “I was on television, doing ‘The Grass Harp’ for ‘The Play of the Week, ‘” Miss Gish said. We had twelve days to learn it and do it. The last day we worked twenty-two hours.” A note of pride entered her voice. “I’m still the iron horse if I can work twenty two hours.” The “iron horse,’ looked slender, dreamy, fragile and wistful in “The Grass Harp” and was cheered by TV critics like some new acting discovery. But the sweet, gentle, innocent maiden lady Miss Gish portrayed on TV was, to some viewers, only…