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Showing posts from June, 2021

HEARTS OF THE WORLD 1918 – Entire film

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  HEARTS OF THE WORLD 1918 – Entire film HEARTS OF THE WORLD Opened at the 44th Street Theatre, New York, April 4, 1918. 12 reels. Directed by D. W. Griffith; scenario by M. Gaston de Tolignac, translated into English by Capt. Victor Marier (both pseudonyms for D. W. Griffith); photographed by G. W. Bitzer; technical supervision by Erich Von Stroheim; music arranged by Carli Elinor and Griffith. Cast: The Grandfather – Adolphe Lestina The Mother – Josephine Crowell The Girl, Marie Stephenson – Lillian Gish The Boy, Douglas Gordon Hamilton – Robert Harron The Father of the Boy – Jack Cosgrave The Mother of the Boy – Kate Bruce The Littlest Brother – Ben Alexander The Boy’s Other Brothers – M. Emmons, F. Marion The Little Disturber – Dorothy Gish Monsieur Cuckoo – Robert Anderson The Village Carpenter – George Fawcett Von Strohm – George Siegmann The Innkeeper – Fay Holderness A Deaf and Blind Musician – L. Lowy A Poilu – Eugene Pouyet A French Peasant Girl – Anna Mae Walthall A Refugee

True Heart Susie (1919) Entire film

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True Heart Susie (1919) Entire film Director: D.W. Griffith Writer: Marian Fremont (story) Released under Paramount Pictures’ prestigious Artcraft label. In 1919 Adolph Zukor devised a three-tiered brand system – the Artcraft division for its high-end, A-list product (ones that could command higher roadshow admissions in major cities) and Realart on the opposite end. The middle tier, which comprised the bulk of the studio’s mainstream releases, was the Paramount banner. This quality classification existed for five years. Note: The life-story of handsome Harron — who had earlier co-starred in the modern episode of Griffith’s Intolerance (1916) — is quite tragic and mysterious; he died from a gunshot wound the year after this film was released, under shadowy circumstances. Lillian Gish … True Heart Susie Robert Harron … William Jenkins Wilbur Higby … William’s father Loyola O’Connor … Susie’s aunt George Fawcett … The Stranger Clarine Seymour … Bettina Hopkins Kate Bruce … Bettina’s aunt

Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) Entire Documentary

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  Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) Entire Documentary Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) Very few people know that Hollywood was largely dominated by women as filmmakers in the 1910s and 20s, there were more women producers and directors in powerful positions before 1920 than at any other time in the motion picture history. Their names were Lois Weber, Mary Pickford, Frances Marion, Alice Guy Blaché, Dorothy Arzner etc … Before the Big Crash women were creatively working in Hollywood at all levels. Unbelievable as it may seem, it took until 2010 for a woman – Kathryn Bigelow – to receive an Oscar for Best Director! Casting in the documentary includes the most successful women to date, Paula Wagner, producer and business partner of Tom Cruise, Robin Swicord, screenwriter and Lynda Obst, producer of, amongst others, Sleepless in Seattle, Contact and Flashdance. And Lillian Gish and Sherry Lansing (archives) 1920 American actress Lillian Gish (1893-1993) makes her only foray into directin

KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview (TV Capture)

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  KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview (TV Capture) Lillian Gish – Mary Martin (Over Easy Camera, New York) Critics, historians, and scholars are virtually unaminous in their agreement that Griffith’s greatest performer was Lillian Gish. John Barrymore compared her with Bernhardt and Duse. Critics rhapsodized over her “Dresden porcelain” beauty. She started with Griffith in 1912 at the age of sixteen and became his preeminent interpreter in such major works as The Birth of a Nation, Broken Blossoms, Way Down East, and Orphans of the Storm. KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview – HDV 720p TV Capture Back to Lillian Gish Home page

Central City Opera House – Now and Then – HDV 720p 29.97 fps

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  Central City Opera House – Now and Then – HDV 720p 29.97 fps In 1877, the citizens of Central City organized a fundraising drive for a grand new opera house befitting the gold mining town’s reputation as “the richest square mile on earth.” Many of the town’s residents were Welsh and Cornish miners, who brought with them a rich tradition of music from their homeland. Prominent Denver architect Robert S. Roeschlaub provided an elegant, understated design for the stone structure, and San Francisco artist John C. Massman added elaborate trompe l’oeil murals to the interior. Her early glory years following the 1878 grand opening were short-lived. When the Central City mines were played out, the Opera House fell into disrepair. Fortunately, a volunteer-driven effort led by Ida Kruse McFarlane, Edna Chappell and Anne Evans led to an extensive restoration of the Opera House in 1932. That summer, the legendary actress Lillian Gish opened the newly restored opera house with Camille, launching

Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives

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  Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives – TV capture VHS quality First lady of the screen, Miss Lillian Gish in an interview filmed in 1978, presented by CBC as an episode in their “Retro-Bites” series. Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives – TV capture VHS quality *** Admin note: Featured photo of Lillian Gish was taken in 1978 indeed, but is a still frame from an interview at BBC Television London. The material above has a low VHS resolution (TV capture) thus any still frame will be affected by the poor footage quality. Thank you for your understanding. Back to Lillian Gish Home page

”The Greatest Question” 1919 – Entire film

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  ”The Greatest Question” 1919 – Entire film A wave of interest in spiritualism has been sweeping the world since the days of the great war. Does after life exist? Can dear one across the Great Beyond exert an influence over earthly destinies? What is the answer to the eternal problem of death ? Griffith had all these questions in mind when he started to screen “The Greatest Question.” So the vital theme of “The Great Question” was carefully buried beneath “action” at “punch.” It became the story of a little waif in the hands of a murderously brutal farmers couple, her love for a neighboring boy and the subsequent finding of oil—with its attendant avalanche of wealth. The whole is gilded with the philosophy that a simple faith meet and overcomes all obstacles. Back to Lillian Gish Home page

Mrs Winchester’s House – CBS 5 – HDV 720p 29.97 fps (Entire Documentary)

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  Mrs Winchester’s House – CBS 5 – HDV 720p 29.97 fps (Entire Documentary) Mrs. Winchester’s House • TV Movie • 1963 • 29min Documentary about the life and legend of Sarah L. Winchester, heiress to the Winchester Repeating Arms Company who, after the death of her husband and only child moved to San Jose, California and constructed non-stop what came to be known as the Winchester Mystery House during the last 38 years of her life. The film traces Mrs. Winchester’s life from her marriage into the wealthy Winchester family, whose family business supplied many of the repeating rifles sold to the United States Army during and after the Civil War and follows her eccentric life in California where, according to legend, she was advised by a mystic to provide shelter for spirits of the victims of her husband’s rifles or follow him to an early grave. It provides point-of-view shots of the interior and exterior of the rambling Victorian mansion. • Director – Dick Williams • Writers o R.E. Pusey J

“Arsenic and Old Lace” 1969 – Entire film (TV capture)

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  “Arsenic and Old Lace” 1969 – Entire film (TV capture) During one of her visits to Rapollo, Lillian was invited to co-star with her longtime friend, actress Helen Hayes, in a television production of Joseph Kesselring’s hit homicidal comedy, Arsenic and Old Lace. Lillian and Helen would be playing two sweet, elderly ladies, sisters, who murder lonely old men after extending an invitation to them to visit and sample their special elderberry wine. Helen Hayes jokingly told this author at their first meeting that she and Lillian had known each other forever. As I grow older, I get forgetful too, but I haven’t reached that point yet. And neither had Lillian when it came to work. She’s sharp as a tack then, as I discovered when we appeared on TV together in Arsenic and Old Lace. It was a challenging production, shot live on a multilevel set that would have tested Edmund Hillary’s climbing ability. (Helen Hayes) Back to Lillian Gish Home page

Hambone and Hillie (1983) Entire Film (VHS low quality)

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  Hambone and Hillie (1983) Entire Film (VHS low quality) Director: Roy Watts Writers: Sandra K. Bailey (screenplay), Michael S. Murphey (screenplay) (as Michael Murphey) Stars: Lillian Gish, Candy Clark, O.J. Simpson Lillian Gish stars as Hillie, an elderly woman whose dog Hambone must travel across the U.S. in order to find her. Back to Lillian Gish Home page

Portrait of Jennie (1948) – Entire film

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  Portrait of Jennie (1948) – Entire film Portrait of Jennie (1948) Director: William Dieterle Writers: Robert Nathan, Paul Osborn, Peter Berneis Stars: Jennifer Jones, Joseph Cotten, Ethel Barrymore, Lillian Gish Awards: Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. Portrait of Jennie is a 1948 fantasy film based on the novella by Robert Nathan. The film was directed by William Dieterle and produced by David O. Selznick. It stars Jennifer Jones and Joseph Cotten. At the 21st Academy Awards, it won an Academy Award for Best Special Effects (Paul Eagler, Joseph McMillan Johnson, Russell Shearman and Clarence Slifer; Special Audible Effects: Charles L. Freeman and James G. Stewart). Joseph H. August was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Cinematography – Black and White. Back to Lillian Gish Home page

LEADING LADIES – 1976 (Electa Clark) PDF Download

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  LEADING LADIES – 1976 (Electa Clark) PDF Download “Humanity marches on into the new and glorious 20th century!” exults a daily paper in its first issue of 1901. “Come, oh century, child of hope!” begins a long poem on page one. Another column trills, “We are 20th century women … with the dower of privilege and responsibility which enriches women in this wonderful era!” Lillian Gish had a similar effect on millions who saw her in the movies. She was not only talented, she had a unique quality: pure, ethereal, elusive. As if she acted in whispers. As if in her hands, the definite blurred into the indefinite. It was drama critic George Jean Nathan who described her as being “behind a veil of silver chiffon.” He courted Lillian for years, but she eluded marriage. Horse drawn float declares National American Woman Suffrage Association’s support for Bristow-Mondell amendment 1920s Lillian Gish Actress ‘La Boheme’ Oversized DBW Photo by Kenneth Alexander Leading ladies an affectionate look

WAY DOWN EAST (Griffith/United Artists, 1920) Entire Film HD

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  WAY DOWN EAST (Griffith/United Artists, 1920) Entire Film HD Lillian Gish undoubtedly does her best work to date as Anna Moore, the featured load. She combines subtly the simple-hearted childishness for which her characterizations have long been known with the hurt reserve that the spirit bruising knocks of a cruel world accomplish so quickly in dazed youth. There are few light touches in her offering, and it is much more effective so. Lillian Gish lifts her eyes to heaven as she flees across the shifting ice floes. Her performance as Anna dramatized the shifting perception of women in the decade following passage of the women’s suffrage amendment. WAY DOWN EAST proved to be one of the most profitable pictures ever made. The master had once more turned the trick. The public was drawn to see an old favorite in a new guise and found its familiar melodramatic qualities heightened beyond expectation. While sticking faithfully to the bones of the play, Griffith had very rightly adapted it